Education Today in the UK.

—Mohammed Mominur Rahman

—Senior Tutor & Educational Consultant

—Excel@Learning

—Latest Results

—BBC News Article by Hannah Richardson and Katherine Sellgren

—Published 26 January 2012

—Analysis of Department of Education Data

—Covering over 5,000 schools with over 200 pieces of information for each school

—This year’s league tables have 4 times as much information as last year.

—The Good News

158 schools see 100% of pupils getting five GCSEs A*-C or equivalent, including maths and English.

95% of pupils who started school “ahead” for their age (achieving Level 5 at the end of primary school) got five good GCSEs, including English and maths.

—Lawrence Sheriff Grammar School in Rugby comes top for GCSE results.

—Sevenoaks School, tops the English Bacc tables, with 99% of pupils meeting this benchmark.

—The Worrying News

107 secondary schools below the floor standard of 35% of pupils getting five good GCSEs, Including English and maths.

Only a third (34%) of children from disadvantaged backgrounds achieve five GCSEs – A* to C, including English and maths.

—Just one in 15 (6.5%) of pupils starting secondary school in England “behind” for their age goes on to get five good GCSEs.

In 909 schools, not one low-attaining pupil (those who did not reach Level 4 at the end of primary school) achieved five GCSEs – A* to C, including English and maths..

—The Political Debate

95% of pupils who started school “ahead” for their age (achieving Level 5 at the end of primary school) got five good GCSEs, including English and maths.

Overall, 58.2% of pupils in England’s state schools got five good GCSEs including English and maths (including equivalent qualifications).

—When BTecs and NVQs, are excluded, 52.4% of pupils gained five good GCSEs.

—The Debate Continues

—Of those who started school at the expected level for their age, (Level 4 at the end of primary school) some 45.6% failed to progress to five good GCSEs

—Minister Nick Gibb said

—Schools which let pupils down would be tackled.

—Pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds aren’t given the same opportunities as their peers.

Children only have one chance at education

—Shadow education secretary Stephen Twigg said the government

—Is promoting pet projects over real need.

Needs to focus on the 3Rs

—What Teachers are Saying:

—Dr Peter Kent, Head of the top performing school, said much of the school’s success was down to Key Stage 4 being spread over three years rather than the traditional two.

—”This gives departments a chance to deliver a very personalised curriculum and we all respond well to something that’s been tailored to our individual needs,

—Maria Ashot says,

—“As a teacher, I have worked wonders with lagging students. Many, many times. It takes a special kind of teacher, and a relationship based on profound trust. The first thing the student or pupil needs to feel is Love & Encouragement from the Teacher. Often, they are lagging because they have been denied encouragement and careful guidance, whether at home or school. It can be done. Believe me!”

—What Teachers are Saying

—Teachers already work on average a 65 hour week. With all the best will in the world, it is not possible to help every child acheive their top potential. Not with this work load.

—Reduce workload,

change the national curriculum (to allow us to reteach basic skills at KS4),

—reduce class sizes.

—If every child matters, education needs more money put into it.

—Try teaching English without books.

—What People are Saying

—Not just a question of “tackling the schools”, but also about nation-wide attitudes and values. Complex social issues to be considered and why the culture of low expectations and underachievement continues.

—Nobody is going to solve anything while policy-makers and managers continue making statistics-based decisions, trying to make reality fit their pet theories and targets. Nobody listens to the students and teachers who have a very different view of what works and what doesn’t.

—Conclusion

Make sure your child is at Level 5 before he/she starts Secondary School.

—If your child is below level 5, Consider some private lessons between the ages of 10 and 14 to help him/her catch up.

—Practices of the best schools and the best teachers should be promoted as benchmarks and good practices

—Students and Teachers be provided with an online reference for learning tools, syllabus information and assessment criteria